Adam Boult 

Feedback loop: your reviews and comments

The best from our readers over the last seven days
  
  

Given the amount of intelligent comment from readers each week on guardian.co.uk/music, it's increasingly difficult to keep up with it all.

So we thought it might be an idea to flag up some of our favourite content, and round up the best stories, reviews and comments from the last seven days.

Top three most popular stories

1. Jessica Ennis and Bradley Wiggins attend secret Stone Roses gig
Olympic gold medal winners join Paul Weller and Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page at show in London.

2. How rave music conquered America
After 20 years, electronic dance music has made it big in the US. And big means big. With Las Vegas's Electric Daisy Carnival grossing $40m (£25m), and DJ Skrillex commanding rock-star fees, the scene is leaving its druggy underground roots behind and being reborn as bombastic super-spectacle.

3. Ry Cooder: 'Mitt Romney is a dangerous man, a cruel man'
The veteran guitarist on his new album of protest songs, Election Special, and how the Republican party is out to destroy America and Barack Obama's presidency.

Top three discussions

1. Readers recommend: Over to you

Marconius:

Quick calculation - if 1000 songs are nominated with an average length of 3 minutes each, it would take 3000 minutes or 50 hours to listen to them all. Working 10 hour days, it would take five days just to listen to them all! Not sure how many songs are nominated on average each week, probably not 1000, but still, even 300 would take fifteen hours of listening to hear them all, though in many cases, the guru probably says nix to a song after only 30 seconds! In any event, Jon, you and the previous gurus have done yeoman work putting up with us and our peccadilloes and putting in the time and effort to bring us RR each week. Many thanks!

Join the conversation

2. Snoop Dogg: a beginner's guide

greatscotmarty:

Any lads in their late 20s/early 30s today that didn't have Doggystyle, The Chronic and Regulate hastily recorded to a couple of TDK cassettes back then (well hidden from Mum of course), never had a childhood.

Join the conversation

3. Bob Dylan's Tempest: first listen

randomeharvest:

Another big rebel from the 60s who has become a pillar of the establishment… Dylan like so many others only appear to be towering and influential, the reality is quite different, they are just products of a hype machine called the music industry which in it's present form is on it's last legs.The internet is too big for the record industry and the quicker people catch on to this the better.


Join the conversation

Top three reader album reviews

1. Frank Ocean – Channel Orange

Lyrically it is broad and dense with Ocean broaching subjects that range from drugs to affluence, love and religion but sung so sweetly that even the darkest themes seem positively angelic. The way Ocean has taken familiar elements and added a modern spin while keeping a sense of fun is what makes the music stand out and is what will keep people coming back to this album.

come2whereimfrom

2. Ghostpoet – Peanut Butter Blues & Melancholy Jam

The entire album is a work of genius. It's an opinion but it's the right one. The strong vibes of finding your way through life the best you can while avoiding its many pitfalls is there in every beat and every word. Ghostpoet has thankfully stepped out of the shadows and into the light that will surely shine brightly for him and his future releases. Spend your hard earned cash and carry a copy home.

Giglover01

3. Def Leppard – Hysteria

Listening back now, it's very easy to date Hysteria, it just sounds so 80s with it's midi sampled drum sounds, lyrics, and Ronald Reagan samples, but that isn't a bad thing, it captured the spirit of the time in a way that still sounds great today - when is the last time you heard Motley Crue or Whitesnake on the radio? To this day Def Leppard continue to fill arena's in the U.S., UK and elsewhere, due in some part to younger generations who are just discovering their classic material like Hysteria.

Ulver

Get involved

If you'd like to review an album, join a discussion, tell us about your own music blog or generally get more involved with guardian.co.uk/music, see the community page for more information on how to go about it.